Energy Medicine, Uncategorized

Nanosponge decoy fights superbug infections

Nanosponge decoy fights superbug infections

Medicated adhesive patches have become a preferred method of delivery for everything from nicotine to hormones to motion sickness medication. Researchers at Drexel University are trying to expand the possibilities of this system–called transdermal delivery–with the help of a cleverly designed delivery vehicle and an ultrasonic “push,” or pressure from sound waves. The advantage of transdermal drug delivery is the ability to regulate the release of medication into the bloodstream and promote a more direct interaction of the treatment with the affected area. But the challenge of this method is that the skin is very good at protecting the body from invaders–even the helpful kind. Steven P. Wrenn, of Drexel’s College of Engineering, and Peter A. Lewin, from Drexel’s School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems, lead a team that is investigating the molecular architecture of human skin and certain promising drugs and compounds, as well as the mechanics of an ultrasound interface necessary to broaden the capabilities of transdermal drug delivery. Their work is part of a larger trend: More and more, researchers are exploring advanced materials and manufacturing techniques for biomedical applications. New, high-precision technologies and more rapid, personalized fabrication methods allow engineers to design on smaller scales, such as those required to traverse the human body. Credit: Drexel University

 

 

 

Provided by National Science Foundation 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *