BLACK SEED and ITS HEALTH BENEFITS

Black Seed truly is an Amazing Herb!
For centuries, the Black Seed herb and oil has been used by millions of people in Asia, Middle East, and Africa to support their health. An aromatic spice, similar looking to sesame seed except black in color, it has been traditionally used for a variety of conditions and treatments related to respiratory health, stomach and intestinal health, kidney and liver function, circulatory and immune system support, and for general overall well-being. Black Seed is also known as Black Cumin, Black Caraway Seed, Habbatul Baraka (the Blessed Seed), and by its botanical name “Nigella Sativa”.

Since 1959, over 200 studies at international universities and articles published in various journals have shown remarkable results supporting its traditional uses recorded almost 1400 years ago.

While the Black Seed is highly effective by itself, ongoing studies with the combination of other herbs have produced remarkable results.

Amazingly Black Seed’s chemical composition is very rich and diverse. Aside from its primary ingredient, crystalline nigellone, Black Seed contains 15 amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, both fixed oils (84% fatty acids, including linolenic, and oleic), and volatile oils, alkaloids, saponin, and crude fiber, as well as minerals such as calcium, iron, sodium and potassium. There are still many components in Black Seed that haven’t been identified. But research is going on around the world. *

Traditional Uses of Black Seed Herb and Oil

Black Seed has over 1400 years history of use. Many ancient books and text suggest the following traditional uses for Black Seed. But please note, that these should not be understood as cures or treatments for any disease or illness.

  • Nervous Tension – A teaspoon of Black Seed Oil with a cup of tea makes you cool down and eliminates symptons of tension.
  • Cough & Asthma – Rub the chest and the back with Black Seed Oil, drink three tablespoons of oil per day and inhale the vapor of a mixture of Black Seed Oil and Water.
  • Sluggishness & Laziness – A tablespoon of Black Seed Oil with orange juice in the morning for ten days (you will see the difference by yourself).
  • Activation of Memory and Quick Perception – A teaspoon of Black Seed Oil with 100mg of boiled mint for ten days.
  • Nausea and Vomiting – A teaspoon of ground carnation plus a tablespoon of Black seed Oil in boiled mint 3 times daily.
  • Heart Disease & Blood Vessel Stenosis – Drink Black Seed Oil continuously with any hot drink. This dissolves fats and dialates veins and arteries
  • Vitiligo & Leprosy – Rub the area with apple vinegar and then with Black Seed Oil for 15 days
  • Headache – Rub the  forehead and the sides of the face near the ears with Black Seed Oil, together with a teaspoon of the oil to be taken 3 times a day.
  • Loss of Hair – Stroke the scalp thoroughly with lemon and leave for 15 minutes. Wash with shampoo and water and after thoroughly drying apply Black Seed Oil to all the scalp. Repeat for one week and the loss of hair will stop completely.
  • Hypertension – Whenever you drink a hot drink mix with a teaspoon of Black Seed Oil and also take two lobes of garlic every morning before breakfast. Rub all the body with Black seed Oil and expose your body to sun rays for an half an hour once every three days. Repeat for about one month.
  • Diabetes – Prepare a mixture of a cup of Black Seed (whole), a cup of water cress seeds, half a cup of pomegranate peel and half a cup of fumitory. Grind the mixture to the power point. Take half a spoon of the mixture together with a teaspoon of Black Seed Oil daily before breakfast for one month
  • Sexual Impotency – Mix 200g of ground Black Seed with olive oil + 100g of ground olibanum + 50g of Black Seed Oil + 50g of water cress oil + 50g of olive oil + 200g of pure bee honey. Mix thoroughly and take a tablespoon after each meal. This will restore vitality even late after menopause.
  • Meningitis – Inhale the vapor of Black Seed and drink a tablespoon of Black Seed Oil with lemon juice in the morning and in the evening

Black Seed oil, Nigella sativa oil for prevention of chronic cyclosporine nephrotoxicity: an experimental model.  Nigella sativa oil for prevention of chronic cyclosporine nephrotoxicity: an experimental model.(Am J Nephrol. 2008;28(3):517-22; Authors: Uz E, Bayrak O, Uz E, Kaya A, Bayrak R, Uz B, Turgut FH, Bavbek N, Kanbay M, Akcay A)

Nephrotoxicity is the main secondary effect of cyclosporine A (CsA) treatment. The antioxidant action of Nigella sativa oil (NSO) may explain the protective effect of these agents against various hepatotoxic and nephrotoxic models in vivo and in vitro. This study was designed to investigate the possible protective effects of NSO, in prevention of chronic CsA-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Animals were randomly divided into four experimental groups: the control group received sunflower oil, the other groups were treated with CsA (25 mg/kg/day b.w. orally) or NSO (2 ml/kg orally) or CsA + NSO, respectively. Urine and serum creatinine levels, tissue superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase enzyme activities, and nitric oxide and malondialdehyde levels were measured, and histological examination was performed. In our study, CsA caused a significant deterioration in the renal function, morphology and gave rise to severe oxidative stress in the kidney. NSO significantly improved the functional and histological parameters and attenuated the oxidative stress induced by CsA. In conclusion, our study demonstrated for the first time that NSO protects kidney tissue against oxygen free radicals, preventing renal dysfunction and morphological abnormalities associated with chronic CsA administration.

Black Seed: Immunomodulatory and therapeutic properties of the Nigella sativa L. seed. (Department of Surgery, Section of Surgical Oncology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA. )

A larger number of medicinal plants and their purified constituents have been shown beneficial therapeutic potentials. Seeds of Nigella sativa, a dicotyledon of the Ranunculaceae family, have been employed for thousands of years as a spice and food preservative. The oil and seed constituents, in particular thymoquinine (TQ), have shown potential medicinal properties in traditional medicine. In view of the recent literature, this article lists and discusses different immunomodulatory and immunotherapeutic potentials for the crude oil of N. sativa seeds and its active ingredients. The published findings provide clear evidence that both the oil and its active ingredients, in particular TQ, possess reproducible anti-oxidant effects through enhancing the oxidant scavenger system, which as a consequence lead to antitoxic effects induced by several insults. The oil and TQ have shown also potent anti-inflammatory effects on several inflammation-based models including experimental encephalomyelitis, colitis, peritonitis, oedama, and arthritis through suppression of the inflammatory mediators prostaglandins and leukotriens. The oil and certain active ingredients showed beneficial immunomodulatory properties, augmenting the T cell- and natural killer cell-mediated immune responses. Most importantly, both the oil and its active ingredients expressed anti-microbial and anti-tumor properties toward different microbes and cancers. Coupling these beneficial effects with its use in folk medicine, N. sativa seed is a promising source for active ingredients that would be with potential therapeutic modalities in different clinical settings. The efficacy of the active ingredients, however, should be measured by the nature of the disease. Given their potent immunomodulatory effects, further studies are urgently required to explore bystander effects of TQ on the professional antigen presenting cells, including macrophages and dendritic cells, as well as its modulatory effects upon Th1- and Th2-mediated inflammatory immune diseases. Ultimately, results emerging from such studies will substantially improve the immunotherapeutic application of TQ in clinical settings.

Pharmacological and toxicological properties of Nigella sativa: The seeds of Nigella sativa Linn. (Ranunculaceae), commonly known as black seed or black cumin, are used in folk (herbal) medicine all over the world for the treatment and prevention of a number of diseases and conditions that include asthma, diarrhoea and dyslipidaemia. This article reviews the main reports of the pharmacological and toxicological properties of N. sativa and its constituents. The seeds contain both fixed and essential oils, proteins, alkaloids and saponin. Much of the biological activity of the seeds has been shown to be due to thymoquinone, the major component of the essential oil, but which is also present in the fi ed oil. The pharmacological actions of the crude extracts of the seeds (and some of its active constituents, e.g. volatile oil and thymoquinone) that have been reported include protection against nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity induced by either disease or chemicals. The seeds/oil have antiinflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic, antimicrobial and antineoplastic activity. The oil decreases blood pressure and increases respiration. Treatment of rats with the seed extract for up to 12 weeks has been reported to induce changes in the haemogram that include an increase in both the packed cell volume (PCV) and haemoglobin (Hb), and a decrease in plasma concentrations of cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose. The seeds are characterized by a very low degree of toxicity. Two cases of contact dermatitis in two individuals have been reported following topical use. Administration of either the seed extract or its oil has been shown not to induce significant adverse effects on liver or kidney functions. It would appear that the beneficial effects of the use of the seeds and thymoquinone might be related to their cytoprotective and antioxidant actions, and to their effect on some mediators of inflammation.

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